Eat Mendocino

2 women, 365 days, 3,878 square miles


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Good Farm Fund Benefit Dinner serves up a side dish of hope

Tomorrow night is my favorite event of the year. And it’s not because of the unparalleled farm to table menu, fancy locally-distilled cocktails, lovely summertime gathering of so many friends and community members, or the fact that we will raise thousands of dollars for local farms. It’s because of what happened when I went to the Dollar Store the other night to buy a few final event supplies…

germain_robin

(Yes, I know. “Eat Local & Shop Local?” Almost everything for the event is locally and consciously sourced/upcycled/reusable. It’s an imperfect wabi-sabi world… So I’m hoping you can suspend judgment about my trip to the Dollar Store, and that I bought a Snickers bar and ate it.)

I needed to purchase picture frames to put on each table for the 3rd Annual Good Farm Fund Benefit Dinner at Yokayo Ranch in Ukiah tomorrow night. We have 26 badass chefs and restaurants attending this year’s event, and each one is paired with local farms to create a special edition locally-sourced menu item served up in small plates all night long along with local wine, beer, spirits, and kombucha. I needed a lot of picture frames to capture this lineup.
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Being in the Dollar Store means facing the unpleasant state of everything I wish were different. A bunch of imported cheap toxic plastic crap creating an illusion of abundance in an over-extracted and underfed world. A mother shopping for a graduate gift with chattering teeth and mumbling to herself, clearly strung out on meth. A young and able-bodied panhandler shamefully asking someone to buy him dinner which eventually manifests as a liter of soda, a bag of chips, and a stick of beef jerky. This is not food, and this is not the world I want.

I walked out with a box full of picture frames in my arms and a heavy heart. I almost wanted to turn around and return everything, hoping it would undo the whole experience – or at least cut into the Dollar Store’s profits by $30. But, as I drove away in the misty coastal rain, I wished not to undo a thing. Because I remembered this is exactly why we founded this organization. It’s exactly why we do this event. Because doing something small and imperfect is so much better than closing your eyes and pretending or wishing that everyone had real food on the table, and a job, and a loving mother.

When Gowan and I completed the year of eating local food, we realized that if enough people tried to do what we did even some of the time, there would be massive food shortages immediately. So she and her family purchased a 40 acre farm in Caspar and set out to produce more food for our community. For me, the question became: how can we scale up local food production and access throughout the county, so that it’s not such a rare – or elitist – endeavor?

This led to the founding of Good Farm Fund. This volunteer-led organization simply wanted to put money in farmers’ pockets so they could farm more land and produce more food, while battling an industrial food system that is rigged against them. In only two years, we have had a real impact on local farms as well as low-income people in our community. Good Farm Fund’s mission is to fund infrastructure development on local farms, and help make local food more affordable for everyone.

goodfarmfundlogoyellowAll event proceeds support Good Farm Fund’s two initiatives:  (1) Funding the EBT/Food Stamp Match at farmers markets to subsidize the cost of local food for families who can’t afford it and (2) The Farm Grant Program which helps support and grow small, local food farms by funding capacity-building projects like greenhouses, farmstands, equipment, and fencing. In 2016, we awarded $20,000 in farm grants to fourteen local farms. Read about our past grant recipients here!

We raise all of the money to do this work right here in Mendocino County through farm-to-table events and generous support from local businesses and community members. That’s the point after all – building sovereignty and resilience in the place we call home, and investing in the future of our local foodshed now.

So, if you haven’t gotten your ticket, yet get it now and come raise your glass to that tomorrow night. It’s a beautiful evening and it’s a chance to do something toward building a different food system while feasting on local food as you have never seen it before. If you can’t make it, but would like to sponsor someone else’s attendance, holler. Or make a donation directly on our website.

xo,
Sarah

Sneak preview of the menu…

Sisters Ridge Chicken Potstickers with Floodgate Farm Loganberry Glaze & Famous Greens

Goat Merguez Sausage Flatbread with Harissa Creme Fraiche and Fermented Veggie Pickle

Crostini with Pastured Chicken Liver Pate with Cherry Ollalieberry Compote

For more info:


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Farm to Table Harvest Feast: A Benefit for Mendocino County School Gardens

Farm to Table Harvest Feast

We are delighted to bring the Farm to Table Dinner experience to our inland community this fall, to help keep school gardens open throughout the county.

Eat Mendocino Presents a Farm to Table Harvest Feast

Hosted at Black Oak Coffee Roasters (476 N. State Street, Ukiah)

Saturday November 9th, 2013

Join us for a 100% Mendocino-grown harvest dinner paired with local wine and coffee

6:00 pm: Open wine bar & behind-the-scenes tour of the roasting room

6:30 pm: Dinner begins

This is a benefit to help save Mendocino County’s School Gardens. We will be raising funds for the Garden Enhanced Nutrition Education (GENE) program, to support a healthy, fresh food future for the children in our community.

Tickets will be available at Black Oak Coffee Roasters and Westside Renaissance Market in Ukiah. Or email eatmendocino@gmail.com to RSVP.

$50 advance/$55 at the door

Contact Sarah for more info (707) 593-6135

Read more about the funding crisis for Mendocino County School Gardens and learn what you can do about it (in addition to coming to the dinner!)